Malcolm London

Founder
Malcolm London

MALCOLM LONDON, called the Gil Scott-Heron of this generation by Cornel West, is an internationally recognized Chicago poet, activist, educator and strategist. London has used the power of language to storm his way into a career of speaking, educating, political organizing and advertising. The arts are a powerful tool in which London seamlessly combines all of his disciplines. With extensive experience educating and amplifying the voices of Chicago, London’s expertise began with poetry and has evolved into successfully aligning diversity and inclusion strategy with companies’ business objectives.

London brings vim and vigor to his energetic performances tackling tough contemporary issues head on. He appeared on PBS for the first-ever televised TED Talk with John Legend and Bill Gates. As an organizer, London was part of a historic youth delegation to the United Nations in Geneva to address police violence in America. Deeply interested in working on ways to tackle sexual violence, mass incarceration, and improve the national education system, London regularly engages high schools, youth jails, colleges and communities through performances, workshops, film and curriculum development. London also started the largest youth open mic in Chicago alongside Chance The Rapper. Malcolm was also one of three artists profiled in the Billboard Documentary piece, “Saving Chicago: Inside Hip-Hops Movement to Make Chicago a Better Place” when his debut project #OPIA, released in October 2016. London is currently involved in a forthcoming documentary “Black Boys Film” which features Philadelphia Eagles’ Malcolm Jenkins and NBA player Carmelo Anthony discussing ways to reimagine the future of Black boys in America. The intersections of race, class, and gender inform London's work, which spans from community art organizations and social movements to creating cultural shifts in company environments that encourage equitable change.

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